Born March 25, 1914 in Dallas, Norman Ernest Borlaug was an agricultural engineer, geneticist, plant pathologist, humanist, and has been called "the man who saved a billion lives"

On this day (March 25), 1914, born in Dallas, Norman Ernest Borlaug was an agricultural engineer, geneticist, plant pathologist, humanist, and has been called "the man who saved a billion lives".
Norman Ernest Borlaug had contact with agricultural production since he was a child, since he grew up on his father's farm where they produced grains.
At the University of Minnesota he obtained his bachelor's degree in 1941 and his doctorate in 1942, both in plant pathology and also in genetics, under the direction of Dr. .EC Stackman.
In 1944 he went to work in Mexico, in the state of Sonora (specifically the Yaqui Valley), as a phytopathologist associated with a program of the Rockefeller Foundation and the Mexican Ministry of Agriculture in where he studied wheat, rusts and agronomic practices.
Norman Borlaug raised grain production in Mexico from 250 thousand tons in 1945 to 1 million tons in 1956, thus achieving the country's self-sufficiency in this crop. 10 years later he had raised production to a level 10 times higher.
Known as the "green revolution," Borlaug's work made possible the application of science to agriculture in developing countries. The wheats developed by his innovative work are currently grown on more than 80 million hectares around the world. Wheats that are high yielding and disease resistant.
By the end of the 1960s, the development of the "green revolution" in Asia, motivated a strong world interest in creating an international system of agricultural research organizations. Thus, in 1966, the International Center for the Improvement of Corn and Wheat was created in Mexico.
Borlaug's work had a global impact by addressing famine and improving the quality of life for several million people. For this in 1970 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize .
One of his sentences was:
"You cannot build peace in the world with empty stomachs and human misery"


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- Where are you going?
- To the wheat field
- again?
- yes, I'm investigating
- and what are you doing in the wheat field?
- Being with wheat...
- how?
- ... live on wheat...
- what?
- ... dance with wheat...
- isn't that a song adapted from Enrique Iglesias?
- yes! What's cool?
- oh yes, shall we sing on the way to the wheat field?
- let's go!
- ..."Love
I want to be with wheat
And live with wheat and dance with wheat
To have with wheat
A crazy night (A crazy night) ..."

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